A group of centrist lawmakers recently revealed an economic relief bill totaling approximately $908 billion. The plan has gained some traction among both congressional Democrats and Senate Republicans, getting talks moving again after Democrats and Republicans have been unable to reach a compromise on a second relief package for months. Here’s a summary of what’s included in the proposal.

Business Aid

The largest chunk of the $908 billion bipartisan bill—$288 billion—is reserved for U.S. businesses, with a focus on primarily assisting small firms, most likely as another round of funding for the Paycheck Protection Program (PPP). This would allow businesses that have since depleted their PPP funding to apply for another round of payments. This time, however, businesses will most likely be required to prove considerable downturns in revenue in order to qualify for assistance. Part of the $288 billion would also likely include another round of Economic Injury Disaster Loans (EIDL), which provide smaller loan amounts than PPP.

Unemployment Aid

The next largest chunk of funding consists of $180 billion, which is dedicated to unemployment benefits for jobless Americans. The bipartisan plan proposes $300 per week to each American on unemployment on top of existing state unemployment benefits at least through March. This is half of the $600 per week that Congress approved in March (that expired in July), but in line with the $300 per week unemployment bonus that was approved in August (most of the funds allocated for that bonus expired in October). One question that has not been addressed is whether the unemployment benefits will be made retroactive to compensate for prior months without jobless benefits.

State and Local Funding

The relief bill offers $160 billion to state and local governments to assist them through the next several months without additional cuts to personnel or services. This has been one of the biggest sticking points in getting an additional relief bill passed as Congressional Republicans contest that that such aid is wasteful “bailouts”. As a condition for their support of the broader package, some Republican lawmakers are considering a compromise by looking to establish new boundaries on state and local funds.

Temporary Protection from Liability Lawsuits

The other big sticking point comes from Democratic opposition for the “liability shield” sought by the GOP. Senate Republicans have tried for months to give business entities immunity from coronavirus-related lawsuits. This bipartisan plan offers a temporary moratorium on COVID liability lawsuits, which would allow time for individual states to draft their own laws.

What’s Not Included?

The bipartisan plan markedly excludes a second round of $1,200 stimulus checks, a measure that has long been supported by congressional Democrats and President Trump. Congressional Republicans have been forthcoming on their resistance to spending more than $1 trillion on another stimulus package, and once unemployment assistance, aid to state and local governments, and small business relief is added up, it’s unfeasible to both include direct checks and keep the overall price-tag below $1 trillion. (Republican Senator Josh Hawley and Sen. Bernie Sanders have since teamed up to propose an amendment to this plan that would include direct stimulus checks to Americans.)

The plan also leaves out Republican-backed tax cuts, including Trump’s call for a payroll tax cut for firms, and Democrats’ push for bonuses to essential workers and health-care professionals. Also missing from the plan is a renewal of the federal moratorium on evictions that is set to expire at the end of the year.

Stephen Reed - Accountant Indianapolis