How Your Small Business Could Be Wasting Money

Most small businesses have limited financial resources, so managing funds wisely and intentionally is crucial to the success of the business. Below are ways in which your small business may be throwing away money that could be needed elsewhere.

Having Overheads that Exceed Profit

It might be common sense, but if you’re not making enough profit to cover your expenses, trouble is on the horizon. Even entrepreneurs can be financially-challenged, so it might be worth it to enlist the help of an accounting professional. Additionally, you should identify the most profitable aspects of your business as well as the ones that are draining resources, and make adjustments however needed.

Staffing Issues

Consider whether your full-time staff is absolutely needed. Could some positions be just as effective in part-time, seasonal, or freelance roles? Too, make sure you’re tapping into your employees’ full potentials. Get to know their interests and individual areas of expertise in order to increase productivity, propel your business forward, and offer new ways to motivate employees to take a vested interest in the success of your business.

Advertising and Marketing Expenses

As a small business owner, you likely don’t have money to waste on untargeted marketing or costly advertising campaigns. Your best bet is probably content marketing, a.k.a. blogging on your website. Brush up on SEO – or tap into the unidentified skills of your employees – to make sure your posts are keyword-optimized and pop up in search engines. Not a writer? Again, tap into the skillset of your employees, or hire a freelance writer. Lastly, think about finding someone to manage your company’s social media accounts and Google ad campaigns.

Trade Shows and Conferences

Though they’re a great way to network while promoting your products or services, they’re often expensive. When funds are tight it’s wise to be choosy about which ones you attend. If one or two specific trade shows or conferences have proven to produce sales and benefit business, just concentrate on having a presence at those venues and forgo the ones that might not be worth the cost.

The Latest Technology

In most instances you really don’t need the latest and greatest that technology has to offer. For example, if you buy a sophisticated software program that requires outsourced labor at a significant cost just to maintain simple records, you might want to rethink whether such a costly program is worth it. Cloud-based services are available to small businesses at low to no cost.

Weak Expense Tracking

If your love as an entrepreneur is building new products, or networking and finding new clients, tracking expenses is likely something that falls on the back burner. Finding a detail-oriented and trustworthy employee to handle this task will benefit your company’s bottom line – and free you up to focus on your strengths. And on your employees’ end, if they know someone is keeping tabs on their spending, they’re likely to be more frugal with company expenses.

Credit Cards and Insurance

Routinely keeping credit card balances in check might seem like a menial housekeeping task, but with interest rates almost always greater than 20 percent, failing to pay your credit cards in full each month is a costly mistake for a small business. Likewise, be sure you’re getting the lowest possible insurance rate for your company to avoid excessive costs. You might also benefit from an independent insurance agent who can go to bat for you when you’re hit with a claim.

Anyone Can Save More for Retirement: Here’s How

You don’t need a high-bracket income when it comes to saving more for retirement. What you need, regardless of income level, is discipline. The following tips can help average workers save more and build the kind of wealth that will support them after leaving the workforce.

Automate the Process

A lot of employers offer the option of diverting a percentage of your paycheck directly into your 401(k) account. This takes the guesswork and mental energy out of saving for retirement and puts the process on autopilot. And employers will often match your contribution up to a certain percentage.

Contribute to an IRA

If you don’t have access to an employer-sponsored account, or want something in addition to your 401(k) account, you might think about opening an individual retirement account. You can contribute up to $6,000 per year ($7,000 for those 50 years and older) to an IRA. Keep in mind, while single employees are able to contribute the maximum to a 401(k) and an IRA in the same year, married couples may have some limitations if both participate in a work-sponsored plan. The rules may also be slightly different for a Roth IRA account.

Be Resourceful

Part-time gigs and side hustles are more popular than ever thanks to the internet and smart phones. If you’re diligent with saving the earnings from a secondary income, it can grow over time. You can also use the funds from side gigs to pay off debt, which will open up your budget to allocate more for retirement savings. For example, bringing in an extra $100 a week equals out to $5,200 a year. From selling your possessions on eBay or Facebook Marketplace to offering a service such as dog walking, car detailing, or tutoring, the possibilities of earning extra income are dependent upon your time, talents, and abilities, but the monetary results have real potential to make an impact on your financial future.

Take Control

According to a 2016 study by U.S. Bank, nearly three out of five American families don’t utilize a budget, but a planned budget can cut down on excessive spending and keep your finances in check on a weekly or monthly basis. Impulse buys (no matter how large or small), add up, as do regular dinners out, pressure to keep up with the Joneses, and unforeseen expenses that crop up here and there. Without a budget and a plan for dealing with the unexpected, it won’t take long for your financial grip to unhitch, sometimes leading to seemingly unsurmountable debt. And debt has the power to undermine your retirement savings potential, either temporarily or for much longer.

With free online budgeting plans, myriad ways to earn some extra income, and a commitment to saving, almost anyone can make saving for retirement an attainable goal.

Small Businesses Should Avoid These Common Startup Mistakes

With the overwhelming amount of pressure and decisions to make when starting a small business, stress can cause even savvy industry gurus to fall for common startup mistakes. In the best scenarios, mistakes will set you back a bit, but in worst-case scenarios, they can hurt your potential and outlook for long-term success. Below are common startup mistakes that can have a negative impact on your small business.

Miscalculating Startup Costs

The perils of starting a business with an insufficient budget, or an underestimated one, can be a shot in the foot before you even get running. Plan to have at least six months’ worth of income in the bank before officially cutting the ribbon to open your business. This will give you some time to get up and going, garner some clients, and generate invoices and payment.

Neglecting to create a marketing strategy

Most new businesses are going to have to put some brain power and cash behind a good marketing plan, and this should be done well in advance of turning on the lights for customers and clients. These plans should include online, offline, social media, and any other means of marketing to get the word out. Will marketing and social media be outsourced, will you handle it personally, or will you bring someone on board to solely handle this task?

Failing to be frugal

Whether through a bank loan, a generous loan from a relative, sales of your own assets, or years of saving your own money, you’re going to have some capital to spend on rent, equipment, products, employees, etc. Keep in mind that profits won’t roll in overnight. Spend your savings wisely, do your research, and make your money stretch.

Thinking you can be a one-man operation

Even if you’re a one-man or one-woman business in the beginning, you’ll need people in your corner. You’ll inevitably want to shoot around ideas with someone; you may need someone, even on a very part-time basis, just to handle invoices and office files; you’ll want feedback, advice, and even potential contacts. Consider if it makes sense for your business to create a board of advisors.

Possible Drawbacks to Early Retirement

Many workers dream of retiring early. Not everyone has a choice in the matter, but if you do, there are some disadvantages and challenges to be aware of. Even if you can afford to retire early, you might not want to.

Here are some disadvantages to be aware of when it comes to early retirement.

Finances

Savings in a traditional IRA or 401(K) can’t be withdrawn without penalty before age 59 ½, so in order to retire earlier, you’ll need to have enough savings in a traditional bank or brokerage account to cover your costs until then. As for social security benefits, you’re allowed to start claiming benefits at 62, but that’s before full retirement age, so claiming early could result in a permanent reduction in benefits (i.e. if your full retirement age is 66 and you claim benefits at 62, you’ll reduce your payments by 25%).

Healthcare

Medicare eligibility doesn’t kick in until age 65, so retiring earlier than that means having to absorb the cost of health insurance independently. If you retire with just a few months to go before Medicare kicks in, you have the option of obtaining short-term coverage, which helps pay for catastrophic medical events but doesn’t typically cover preventive care or pre-existing conditions. If you’re looking at a longer stretch between retirement and Medicare eligibility, you’ll need to shop around for major medical insurance. These plans are the most comprehensive for early retirees and cover a broad range of medical care, from doctor visits to major surgery.

Mental Health

Early retirees can have a difficult time adjusting to an unstructured schedule. With high levels of energy and drive, and a strong desire to still be productive, they risk sinking into boredom and depression as they progress deeper into retirement. Increased anxiety, dementia, and cardiovascular disease have all been linked to health risks of early retirement as well. For this reason, it’s a good idea to keep an open mind about returning to work should you start to feel that early retirement wasn’t as fulfilling as you’d hoped.

Be Prepared

Though there are some things to think about before retiring early, with careful planning and goal setting, you can make it work. It’s best to begin saving consistently (and early) – in a Roth IRA or traditional 401(K), but also in a nontraditional retirement plan so that you can have access to those funds before age 58 ½. Financial planners advise to save 30% of your income, as opposed to the conventional target of 10% or 15%. And transfer all tax refunds and bonuses into your nest egg as well. In short, cutting out your daily coffee house latte isn’t going to get you to early retirement.

Hidden Retirement Fees to Be Aware Of

Financial advisors commonly advise their clients to seek investments with high returns in order to maximize their retirement funds, but most investors don’t realize that high fees are eating into those earnings.

While fund fees have steadily declined in recent years, many investors don’t realize how much they’re paying in fees to begin with or how much these expenses and other investment costs are eating into their retirement savings. Remember that as your investment returns compound over time, so do the fees, which means your payments could accumulate to 2% or more.

Below are some of those hidden fees and what you can do to avoid them.

Expense Ratios

This refers to the annual fees charged by all mutual funds, index funds, and exchange-traded funds as a percentage of your investment in the fund. Expense ratios apply to all types of retirement funds, such as your 401(k), individual retirement account, or brokerage account, and they cut a percentage of your investment in the fund depending on its annual yield.

Mutual Fund Transaction Fees

This is a fee you pay a broker to buy and sell some mutual funds on your behalf, similar to a “trade commission” that a broker would charge to buy or sell stock.

Sales Load

These fees surface when a broker successfully sells a fund to you that has a sales charge or commission.

Administrative Fees

These fees are associated with maintaining your portfolio or brokerage account.

Brokerage Account Inactivity Fees

If your account allows you to buy and trade at any time, you could face an unexpected inactivity charge if you don’t trade for a few months.

To determine whether your retirement fees are too high, check the fee disclosure and look at the expense ratios on the mutual funds you are invested in. Likewise, check these fees before you invest in a mutual fund you are interested in.

To help balance your investment accounts and minimize your retirement fees, take advantage of lower-fee mutual funds if your 401(k) plan already has an expense ratio of over 1%.

Finally, be aware that fees may also be related to how much advice you’re getting and where that advice is coming from. Human advisors are more expensive than robo-advisors, and an actively managed fund will cost more than an index fund or an exchange-traded fund (ETF).